Pablo Picasso, 'Head of a Woman (Fernande)' 1909
Booking Closed Tate Modern Exhibition

Matisse Picasso

11 May – 18 August 2002
Pablo Picasso, Head of a Woman (Fernande) 1909. © Succession Picasso/DACS 2016, courtesy Private Collection

Matisse Picasso at Tate Modern brings together major masterpieces by the two giants of modern art. Between them Matisse and Picasso originated many of the most significant developments of twentieth-century painting and sculpture. Now you can discover more about their fascinating and intricate relationship in this long-awaited exhibition which opens at Tate Modern and subsequently travels to Paris and New York.

Through a series of over thirty groupings of paintings and sculpture, this major exhibition gives you the opportunity to compare and contrast Matisse's expressive use of colour and line alongside Picasso's stylistic virtuosity.

You can trace the artists' relationship from its beginnings in Paris in 1906, when they first met regularly in the studio of the collectors Gertrude and Leo Stein, to the period after Matisse's death in 1954, when Picasso paid tribute to him in his work, both directly and indirectly. In spite of their initial rivalry, the exhibition will reveal how each artist came to acknowledge the other as his only true equal.

The exhibition is a collaboration between Tate, the Réunion des musées nationaux/Musée Picasso with the Musée national d'art moderne/Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Venue

Tate Modern
Bankside
London
SE1 9TG
Plan your visit

Dates

11 May – 18 August 2002