Henry Moore: Sculptural Process and Public Identity

ISBN 978-1-84976-391-2

Henry Moore Postcard to Sir Kenneth Clark postmarked 18 October 1951

Moore sent this postcard of a study for the Burgers of Calais by the nineteeth-century French sculptor Rodin to Sir Kenneth and Lady Clark when he visited an open-air museum of sculpture in Antwerp. This was likely to have been Middelheim Park, where in 1953 Moore exhibited a cast of the sculpture King and Queen 1952–3 (Tate T00228) in the Second Biennial for Sculpture.
Rodin was a favourite artist of Moore’s, who later wrote, ‘This is in my opinion the greatness of Rodin, that he could identify himself with and feel so strongly about the human body. He believed it was the basis of all sculpture. He understood the human figure so well and loved it so much that this is the universal quality about him. And out of the body he could make these marvellous sculptural rhythms’ (Rodin Sculpture and Drawings, exhibition catalogue, Hayward Gallery, London 1970).

Transcript

[Handwritten:]
ROTTERDAM.
Love to you both.
Henry.
I’m here for a day or two looking at an “open-air” museum of sculpture in Antwerp.
Sir Kenneth and Lady Clark
Upper Terrace House
Upper Terrace
Hampstead
London N.W.3
ENGLAND.
[Printed on postcard:]
AUGUSTE RODIN, 1840–1917
PIERRE DE WIESSANT, VOORSTUDIE VOOR ÉÉN DER BURGERS VAN CALAIS,
Museum Boymans, Rotterdam

How to cite

Henry Moore, Postcard to Sir Kenneth Clark, postmarked 18 October 1951, in Henry Moore: Sculptural Process and Public Identity, Tate Research Publication, 2015, https://www.tate.org.uk/art/research-publications/henry-moore/henry-moore-postcard-to-sir-kenneth-clark-r1145499, accessed 20 April 2019.