Paint and Draw

Draw a Dancer

Artist Joey Yu shows you how to draw to music

You will need

  • Paper
  • Paint
  • Brushes
  • Water to wash your brushes
  • A cardboard palette
  • You might want some headphones so you can listen to the video

Joey uses paint in this video, but you could also use pens and pencils to make your drawing. Any paint, paper and brushes will work but Joey recommends using bigger paper if you have it and using a mix of brushes if you have them.

This activity is based around music. If you are deaf or hard of hearing, you might want to ask a friend to describe the music to you or Draw a Friend instead.

Other ideas to try

  • You could choose another piece of music and try to feel the vibrations (you could lie on the floor if your speaker is on the floor, or put your hand on the speaker). Draw how the vibrations feel to you.
  • Put on your favourite piece of music. What happens when you listen to it? Can you feel it in your body? Do you want to move? Make an artwork that expresses how you feel when you listen to the music or feel the vibrations.

Artists included in this video

Cy Twombly, ‘Untitled (Bacchus)’ 2008
Cy Twombly
Untitled (Bacchus) 2008
Tate
© Cy Twombly Foundation
Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson, ‘Dance Hall Scene’ c.1913–14
Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson
Dance Hall Scene c.1913–14
Tate
Paula Rego, ‘Drawing for ‘The Dance’’ 1988
Paula Rego
Drawing for ‘The Dance’ 1988
Tate
© Paula Rego

A note for teachers

Watching this video your students will generate ideas independently. They will make a creative response drawing on their own experience. They will learn about using different materials including paint. Taking inspiration from famous artists they will develop a range of ideas.