The Académie Julian was a major alternative school to the official Ecole des Beaux Arts, especially for women who were not admitted to the Beaux Arts until 1897

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  • Pierre Bonnard, 'Bathing Woman, Seen from the Back' circa 1919
    Pierre Bonnard
    Bathing Woman, Seen from the Back circa 1919
    Oil on canvas
    support: 441 x 346 mm
    frame: 631 x 534 x 105 mm
    Bequeathed by the Hon. Mrs A.E. Pleydell-Bouverie through the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1968© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2002
  • Edouard Vuillard, 'Sunlit Interior' circa 1920
    Edouard Vuillard
    Sunlit Interior circa 1920
    Distemper on paper laid on canvas
    support: 832 x 638 mm
    Bequeathed by the Hon. Mrs A.E. Pleydell-Bouverie through the Friends of the Tate Gallery 1968© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2002

Established in Paris, France in 1868 by Rodolphe Julian, the Académie Julian became a major alternative training centre to the official Ecole des Beaux Arts. Not only were women admitted as students to the Julian, but they were also permitted to draw from the nude male model.

In 1888–9 Pierre Bonnard and Edouard Vuillard were students there and together with some others formed the symbolist group the Nabis. The Académie Julian was popular with foreign art students and many leading modern artists spent time there.