Turner Prize 2002 exhibition web banner
Turner Prize 2002
Tate Britain: Exhibition
30 October 20025 January 2003
Part of the series Turner Prize

The Turner Prize 2002 was awarded to Keith Tyson.

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  • Turner Prize 2002 exhibition poster

    Turner Prize 2002 exhibition poster

  • Fiona Banner installation Turner Prize 2002

    Fiona Banner installation Turner Prize 2002

    Photo:
    © Tate Photography, Courtesy the artist and Frith Street Gallery, London

  • Liam Gillick Turner Prize installation 2002

    Liam Gillick installation Turner Prize 2002

    Photo:
    © Tate Photography, Courtesy Corvi - Mora, London,
    © The artist

  • Keith Tyson Turner Prize installation 2002

    Keith Tyson Turner Prize installation 2002

    © The artist
    Photo:
    © Tate Photography

  • Catherine Yass Turner Prize installation 2002

    Catherine Yass Turner Prize installation 2002

    Courtesy the artist and aspreyjacques, London

The Turner Prize is widely considered to be one of the most important and prestigious awards for the visual arts in Europe. The £20,000 prize was presented to Keith Tyson in a ceremony at Tate Britain on Sunday 8 December 2002, during a live television broadcast by Channel 4. The judges commended the way in which ‘his work embraces the poetic, the logical, the humorous, and the fantastical and draws connections between them’.

Shortlist

  • Fiona Banner – nominated
  • Liam Gillick – nominated
  • Keith Tyson – awarded
  • Catherine Yass – nominated

Jury

  • Michael Archer, critic and lecturer
  • Susan Ferleger Brades, Director of the Hayward Gallery
  • Alfred Pacquement, Director of the National Museum of Modern Art at the Georges Pompidou Centre
  • Greville Worthington, collector and curator is this year’s representative of the Patrons of New Art on the Turner Prize panel
  • Nicholas Serota, Director of Tate

Turner Prize 2002 in quotes

If this is the best that British artists can produce, then British art is lost. It is cold, mechanical conceptual bullshit … The attempts at contextualisation are particularly pathetic and symptomatic of a lack of conviction.
Comments from Kim Howells, Minister of Culture, 2002
As a junior minister at the Department of Culture for Culture, Media and Sport, he is one of the few people in the country who is not entitled to air his opinions about art.
Editorial in The Daily Telegraph, November 2002