Joseph Mallord William Turner

Dryslwyn Castle: Distant View from the South

1798

In Tate Britain

Prints and Drawings Room

View by appointment
Artist
Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775–1851
Medium
Graphite on paper
Dimensions
Support: 229 x 332 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856
Reference
D01331
Turner Bequest XXXVIII 77

Catalogue entry

The subject was drawn with the page turned horizontally. Dryslwyn is a Welsh castle of the early thirteenth century, captured by Edward I in 1287. Its ruins dominate the fertile valley of the Tyfi, in which it stands half-way between Llandeilo and Carmarthen; see folio 28 recto (D01271; Turner Bequest XXXVIII 21). Another view of Dryslwyn is on folio 34 recto (D01355; Turner Bequest XXXVIII 101).
In 1909 Finberg noted that this leaf, then loose, was ‘Probably p.27a’,1 that is to say originally falling between what are now folios 36 recto and 38 recto (D01278, D01279; Turner Bequest XXXVIII 27, 28), but D01342 (Turner Bequest XXXVIII 88) has since been bound in at that position. He later thought that this drawing might show Carreg Cennen Castle;2 see under folio 23 recto (D01341; Turner Bequest XXXVIII 87).
1
Finberg 1909, I, p.88; see also p.85.
2
A.J. Finberg, undated MS note in interleaved copy of Finberg 1909, Tate Brain Prints and Drawings Room, I, opposite p.88.
Verso:
Blank; stamped in brown ink with Turner Bequest monogram.

Andrew Wilton
May 2013

Read full Catalogue entry

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