Joseph Mallord William Turner

Sketches of the Shoreline of the Cromarty Firth

1831

Not on display

Artist
Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775–1851
Medium
Graphite on paper
Dimensions
Support: 104 × 163 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856
Reference
D27128
Turner Bequest CCLXXVII 64

Catalogue entry

The rough lines drawn horizontally across the page are recognisable as Turner’s quick method of sketching the outlines of hills or, in this case, shorelines. However, the sketches overlap and some were drawn with the book inverted, so it is not possible to tell how many sketches there are and to disentangle them. The page, however, is inscribed with what David Wallace-Hadrill has read as ‘Cromarty Firth’.1 During his 1831 tour of Scotland, Turner stayed with his friend and patron Hugh Munro at Novar House near Evanton, on the northern shore of the Cromarty Firth. He may have crossed the firth from Evanton to Cromarty on his return south (see folio 28 verso; D27086). The current sketches were probably made quite rapidly as he travelled along the shore of the Firth, or perhaps as he crossed it.
1
David Wallace-Hadrill and Janet Carolan, ‘Sketchbook CCLXXVII Inverness’, [circa 1991], Tate catalogue files, [unpaginated].
Verso:
Blank

Thomas Ardill
April 2010

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