Charlotte Prodger wins Turner Prize

Charlotte Prodger. Portrait, 2017. Photography © Emile Holba 2018

Charlotte Prodger. Portrait, 2017. Photography © Emile Holba 2018

The Turner Prize 2018 has been awarded to Charlotte Prodger it was announced at Tate Britain this evening. The £25,000 prize was presented by author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie during a live broadcast on the BBC, the broadcast partner for the prize. A further £5,000 is awarded to each of the other shortlisted artists.

The jury applauded the way that all four nominated artists are committed to making a difference to the world today and are very proud of the timely and urgent nature of the Turner Prize 2018 shortlist. They awarded the prize to Charlotte Prodger for her solo exhibition BRIDGIT / Stoneymollen Trail at Bergen Kunsthall. Using a smartphone, Prodger interweaves bodies, thoughts and landscape in her work. The jury admired the painterly quality of BRIDGIT and the attention it pays to art history. The work meanders through disparate associations ranging from JD Sports and standing stones to 1970s lesbian separatism and Jimi Hendrix’s sound recordist. They praised the way Prodger explores lived experience as mediated through technologies and histories.

One of the best known prizes for the visual arts in the world, the Turner Prize aims to promote public debate around new developments in contemporary British art. The Prize, established in 1984 by the Patrons of New Art, is awarded to a British artist for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of their work in the twelve months preceding 26 April 2018. The shortlisted artists for 2018 were: Forensic Architecture, Naeem Mohaiemen, Charlotte Prodger and Luke Willis Thompson.

The members of the Turner Prize 2018 jury are Oliver Basciano, art critic and International Editor at ArtReview; Elena Filipovic, Director of Kunsthalle Basel; Lisa Le Feuvre, Executive Director of Holt-Smithson Foundation; and Tom McCarthy, novelist and Visiting Professor, Royal College of Art. The Chair of the jury is Alex Farquharson, Director, Tate Britain.

An exhibition of the four shortlisted artists is at Tate Britain until 6 January 2019.

For press information contact Cecily.Carbone@tate.org.uk or Jean.Tang@tate.org.uk or call +44(0)20 7887 8730/8731. For high-resolution images visit tate.org.uk/press

Previous Turner Prize winners are: 1984 Malcolm Morley; 1985 Howard Hodgkin; 1986 Gilbert & George; 1987 Richard Deacon; 1988 Tony Cragg; 1989 Richard Long; 1990 (Prize suspended); 1991 Anish Kapoor; 1992 Grenville Davey; 1993 Rachel Whiteread; 1994 Antony Gormley; 1995 Damien Hirst; 1996 Douglas Gordon; 1997 Gillian Wearing; 1998 Chris Ofili; 1999 Steve McQueen; 2000 Wolfgang Tillmans; 2001 Martin Creed; 2002 Keith Tyson; 2003 Grayson Perry; 2004 Jeremy Deller; 2005 Simon Starling; 2006 Tomma Abts; 2007 Mark Wallinger; 2008 Mark Leckey; 2009 Richard Wright; 2010 Susan Philipsz; 2011 Martin Boyce; 2012 Elizabeth Price; 2013 Laure Prouvost; 2014 Duncan Campbell; 2015 Assemble; 2016 Helen Marten; 2017 Lubaina Himid.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Enugu, Nigeria in 1977. She graduated summa cum laude from Eastern Connecticut State University with a degree in Communication and Political Science. She has a Master’s Degree in Creative Writing from Johns Hopkins University and a Master of Arts degree in African History from Yale University. Ms. Adichie’s work has been translated into over thirty languages. Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus (2003), won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize, and her second novel, Half of a Yellow Sun (2006), won the Orange Prize. Her 2013 novel Americanah won the US National Book Critics Circle Award, and was named one of The New York Times Top Ten Best Books of 2013. She has delivered two landmark TED talks: her 2009 TED Talk The Danger of A Single Story and her 2012 TEDx Euston talk We Should All Be Feminists, which started a worldwide conversation about feminism, and was published as a book in 2014. Her most recent book, Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions, was published in March 2017. Ms. Adichie divides her time between the United States and Nigeria, where she leads an annual creative writing workshop.

Charlotte Prodger was born in Bournemouth, UK in 1974. She studied at Goldsmiths, London and The Glasgow School of Art.

Recent solo exhibitions include: BRIDGIT/Stoneymollan Trail, Bergen Kunsthall; Subtotal, Sculpture Center, New York (2017); BRIDGIT, Hollybush Gardens, London; Charlotte Prodger, Kunstverein Düsseldorf (2016); 8004-8019, Spike Island, Bristol; Stoneymollan Trail, Temple Bar Gallery, Dublin (2015); Markets, Chelsea Space, London; Nephatiti, Glasgow International Director’s Programme, Glasgow (2014); Percussion Biface 1-13, Studio Voltaire, London; Colon Hyphen Asterix, Intermedia CCA, Glasgow (2012) and Handclap/Punchhole, Kendall Koppe, Glasgow (2011). Recent group exhibitions include: Always Different, Always the Same: An Essay on Art and Systems, Bunder Kunstmuseum, Chur; ORGASMIC STREAMING ORGANIC GARDENING ELECTROCULTURE, Chelsea Space, London (2018); British Art Show 8 (2016); Weight of Data, Tate Britain, London; An Interior that Remains an Exterior, Künstlerhaus Graz (2015); A Survey of Recent Artists’ Film and Video in Britain, Tate Britain, London; Annals of The Twentieth Century, Wysing Arts, Cambridge (2014) Holes In The Wall, Kunsthalle Freiburg and Frozen Lakes, Artists Space, New York (2013). Prodger received the 2014 Margaret Tait Award and 2017 Paul Hamlyn Award.

Charlotte Prodger is 44 and lives and works in Glasgow.