Visitor looking at Hew Locke's artwork of hanging boats

Hew Locke Armada 2019. Installation view at Tate Liverpool © Tate Liverpool (Gareth Jones)

Journeys through the Tate Collection

Jannis Kounellis, Untitled  1969

Untitled 1969 consists of seven burlap sacks lined up in an uneven row on the floor, against the wall. Each sack is filled with a different dried pulse or bean: chickpeas, coffee beans, green lentils, green peas, kidney beans, white beans and maize. The top of each sack is rolled back so that the contents can be seen. The sacks slump this way and that, some leaning against each other, some against the wall and some away from it.

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Shikanosuke Yagaki, Stairs  1930–9

Shikanosuke Yagaki was an active member of many of the amateur photography clubs flourishing in Japan in the 1930s, including the Sanwa Bank Photo Club, the Karashishi-kai Photo Group, and the Kyoto Leica Club and his work was widely exhibited. Despite a lack of professional training, Yagaki developed a sophisticated style which combined the influence of European modernism with typical Japanese subjects. His work shows a great understanding of the camera’s potential, playing with movement, perspective, light and shadow.

Gallery label, June 2011

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Edmund Collein, Untitled (Material Study, Construction of Glass Plates, Josef Albers’ Preliminary Course, Bauhaus Dessau)  c.1927–30

3/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Iwao Yamawaki, Zuyev Workers’ Club Moscow  1931

Born in Fujita, Nagasaki, Iwao Yamawaki studied architecture at the Tokyo School of Arts and after graduating worked as an architect in a construction company. During this time, he took pictures with his 35mm camera to support and document his architectural studies. In 1931 he travelled to Germany to study at the Bauhaus in Dessau and became heavily influenced by László Moholy-Nagy’s idea that photography could open up new ways of seeing the world beyond those available to the human eye. Yamawaki travelled widely in Europe and the Soviet Union, documenting modernist architecture and design, as well as capturing student life at the Bauhaus.

Gallery label, November 2015

4/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Iwao Yamawaki, Bauhaus Student  1930–2

Born in Fujita, Nagasaki, Iwao Yamawaki studied architecture at the Tokyo School of Arts and after graduating worked as an architect in a construction company. During this time, he took pictures with his 35mm camera to support and document his architectural studies. In 1931 he travelled to Germany to study at the Bauhaus in Dessau and became heavily influenced by László Moholy-Nagy’s idea that photography could open up new ways of seeing the world beyond those available to the human eye. Yamawaki travelled widely in Europe and the Soviet Union, documenting modernist architecture and design, as well as capturing student life at the Bauhaus.

Gallery label, November 2015

5/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Sorry, no image available

Cameron Rowland, Assessment  2018

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Zarina Hashmi, Letters from Home  2004

This series of prints is based on letters written by the artist’s sister who lived in Pakistan. Lines of handwritten prose in Urdu are overlaid and obscured with maps and blueprints of distant homes and places. The letters mark significant moments – the death of a parent, for instance – and some of the prints bear impressions of places relevant to their estranged lives. Hashmi maps and conveys the experience of loss and dispossession due to political conflict. The break with the Urdu literary culture of undivided India is poignant for the artist who was born in Aligarh, a university town and centre of learning.

Gallery label, April 2013

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Lionel Wendt, [title not known]  c.1933–8

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Lionel Wendt, [title not known]  c.1933–8

9/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Iwao Yamawaki, Untitled (Modernist architecture)  1930–2

Born in Fujita, Nagasaki, Iwao Yamawaki studied architecture at the Tokyo School of Arts and after graduating worked as an architect in a construction company. During this time, he took pictures with his 35mm camera to support and document his architectural studies. In 1931 he travelled to Germany to study at the Bauhaus in Dessau and became heavily influenced by László Moholy-Nagy’s idea that photography could open up new ways of seeing the world beyond those available to the human eye. Yamawaki travelled widely in Europe and the Soviet Union, documenting modernist architecture and design, as well as capturing student life at the Bauhaus.

Gallery label, November 2015

10/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Iwao Yamawaki, Untitled (Composition with bricks, Bauhaus)  1930–2

Born in Fujita, Nagasaki, Iwao Yamawaki studied architecture at the Tokyo School of Arts and after graduating worked as an architect in a construction company. During this time, he took pictures with his 35mm camera to support and document his architectural studies. In 1931 he travelled to Germany to study at the Bauhaus in Dessau and became heavily influenced by László Moholy-Nagy’s idea that photography could open up new ways of seeing the world beyond those available to the human eye. Yamawaki travelled widely in Europe and the Soviet Union, documenting modernist architecture and design, as well as capturing student life at the Bauhaus.

Gallery label, November 2015

11/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

György Kepes, Hand on Black Ground  c.1939–40

This is one of a large group of photograms and studies in modernist photography in Tate’s collection by the Hungarian-born photographer, painter, designer, teacher and writer, Gyorgy Kepes (see Tate P80532–P80568, T13973–T13975). They date from 1938 to the early 1940s and were made in the United States, where Kepes had emigrated in 1937. Kepes made his earliest photograms in Budapest, taking nature as his starting point, directly recording the process without a camera onto photosensitized surfaces. In the late 1920s Kepes joined the Berlin studio of the Hungarian artist and modernist photographer László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946). Moholy-Nagy had been a teacher at the Bauhaus School in Germany and was one of the principals in promoting the values of the Bauhaus movement, as well as a pioneer who experimented with a multitude of materials and techniques. Kepes was introduced to the ‘new vision’ provided by the possibilities of modern art techniques while collaborating alongside Moholy-Nagy. He began to experiment with photograms himself – photographic prints made in the darkroom by placing objects directly onto light sensitive paper and exposing the paper to light. Later, he made prints he called ‘photo-drawings’, in which he applied paint to a glass plate that he then used as though it were a negative. Only a few of Kepes’s works from this earlier period survived the artist’s many moves in the 1930s and the Second World War.

12/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Tadeusz Suminski, Air Heater Rotor, Racibórz Boiler Factory  1962

This is one of nine small black and white silver gelatin photographs in Tate’s collection by the post-war Polish photographer Tadeusz Suminski that were taken in Polish factories. They come from a larger body of work made between 1962 and 1964 for an assignment on new industrial complexes in Poland; Suminski later selected certain images such as these to develop and print privately for inclusion in exhibitions and competitions. The photographs feature closely cropped details of machines and mass-produced industrial products arranged in careful compositions that verge on abstraction. By focusing on serial patterns and contrasts of light and shade, they draw attention to the potential for beauty inherent in the machine-made, industrial environment. The works are titled descriptively according to the factory in which they were taken and the material or machine they depict. Tate’s prints are vintage prints, acquired from the artist’s estate.

13/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Tadeusz Suminski, Cigarettes, Czyzyny  1962

This is one of nine small black and white silver gelatin photographs in Tate’s collection by the post-war Polish photographer Tadeusz Suminski that were taken in Polish factories. They come from a larger body of work made between 1962 and 1964 for an assignment on new industrial complexes in Poland; Suminski later selected certain images such as these to develop and print privately for inclusion in exhibitions and competitions. The photographs feature closely cropped details of machines and mass-produced industrial products arranged in careful compositions that verge on abstraction. By focusing on serial patterns and contrasts of light and shade, they draw attention to the potential for beauty inherent in the machine-made, industrial environment. The works are titled descriptively according to the factory in which they were taken and the material or machine they depict. Tate’s prints are vintage prints, acquired from the artist’s estate.

14/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Bruce Onobrakpeya, Jesus is laid in the tomb  1969

This is one in a series by Nigerian artist Bruce Onobrakpeya comprising fourteen linocut prints on paper in an elongated landscape format. The subject is a biblical one, with each of the prints depicting a different moment from Jesus’ last days on Earth as a man, beginning with his condemnation by Pontius Pilate and ending with his crucifixion and laying in the tomb. The episodes portrayed – known in Christian theology as The Stations of the Cross – are precisely detailed and dramatised in Onobrakpeya’s prints, but have been placed within an African setting. The apostles wear vividly patterned local Adire prints and those restraining Jesus appear to be wearing colonial-era police uniform. The overall palette of the series is blue and green, with hints of yellow and highlights in orange. Geometric shapes abound, recalling patterns found on traditional Nigerian textiles and architecture. While these forms structure the compositions, they also extend onto the crosses that feature prominently in many of the images. The prints are individually titled as follows: Jesus is Condemned to Death, Jesus Takes his Cross, Jesus Falls the First Time, Jesus Meets his Mother, Simon of Cyrene Helps Jesus, Veronica Wipes Jesus’ Face, Jesus Falls the Second Time, Jesus and the Women of Jerusalem, Jesus Falls the Third Time, Jesus’ Clothes are Torn Off, Jesus is Nailed to the Cross, Jesus Dies on the Cross, Jesus is Taken from the Cross and Jesus is Laid in the Tomb. Thirteen of the prints are number eight in an edition of fifty. Jesus Falls the First Time is number eight in an edition of forty-eight. Complete sets of the prints are rare; although they can be shown individually, they are ideally shown all together as they were in the inaugural exhibition at Tate Modern, London in 2001, Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis.

15/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Bruce Onobrakpeya, Jesus is nailed to the cross  1969

This is one in a series by Nigerian artist Bruce Onobrakpeya comprising fourteen linocut prints on paper in an elongated landscape format. The subject is a biblical one, with each of the prints depicting a different moment from Jesus’ last days on Earth as a man, beginning with his condemnation by Pontius Pilate and ending with his crucifixion and laying in the tomb. The episodes portrayed – known in Christian theology as The Stations of the Cross – are precisely detailed and dramatised in Onobrakpeya’s prints, but have been placed within an African setting. The apostles wear vividly patterned local Adire prints and those restraining Jesus appear to be wearing colonial-era police uniform. The overall palette of the series is blue and green, with hints of yellow and highlights in orange. Geometric shapes abound, recalling patterns found on traditional Nigerian textiles and architecture. While these forms structure the compositions, they also extend onto the crosses that feature prominently in many of the images. The prints are individually titled as follows: Jesus is Condemned to Death, Jesus Takes his Cross, Jesus Falls the First Time, Jesus Meets his Mother, Simon of Cyrene Helps Jesus, Veronica Wipes Jesus’ Face, Jesus Falls the Second Time, Jesus and the Women of Jerusalem, Jesus Falls the Third Time, Jesus’ Clothes are Torn Off, Jesus is Nailed to the Cross, Jesus Dies on the Cross, Jesus is Taken from the Cross and Jesus is Laid in the Tomb. Thirteen of the prints are number eight in an edition of fifty. Jesus Falls the First Time is number eight in an edition of forty-eight. Complete sets of the prints are rare; although they can be shown individually, they are ideally shown all together as they were in the inaugural exhibition at Tate Modern, London in 2001, Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis.

16/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Bruce Onobrakpeya, Jesus is taken from the cross  1969

This is one in a series by Nigerian artist Bruce Onobrakpeya comprising fourteen linocut prints on paper in an elongated landscape format. The subject is a biblical one, with each of the prints depicting a different moment from Jesus’ last days on Earth as a man, beginning with his condemnation by Pontius Pilate and ending with his crucifixion and laying in the tomb. The episodes portrayed – known in Christian theology as The Stations of the Cross – are precisely detailed and dramatised in Onobrakpeya’s prints, but have been placed within an African setting. The apostles wear vividly patterned local Adire prints and those restraining Jesus appear to be wearing colonial-era police uniform. The overall palette of the series is blue and green, with hints of yellow and highlights in orange. Geometric shapes abound, recalling patterns found on traditional Nigerian textiles and architecture. While these forms structure the compositions, they also extend onto the crosses that feature prominently in many of the images. The prints are individually titled as follows: Jesus is Condemned to Death, Jesus Takes his Cross, Jesus Falls the First Time, Jesus Meets his Mother, Simon of Cyrene Helps Jesus, Veronica Wipes Jesus’ Face, Jesus Falls the Second Time, Jesus and the Women of Jerusalem, Jesus Falls the Third Time, Jesus’ Clothes are Torn Off, Jesus is Nailed to the Cross, Jesus Dies on the Cross, Jesus is Taken from the Cross and Jesus is Laid in the Tomb. Thirteen of the prints are number eight in an edition of fifty. Jesus Falls the First Time is number eight in an edition of forty-eight. Complete sets of the prints are rare; although they can be shown individually, they are ideally shown all together as they were in the inaugural exhibition at Tate Modern, London in 2001, Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis.

17/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Bruce Onobrakpeya, Jesus meets his mother  1969

This is one in a series by Nigerian artist Bruce Onobrakpeya comprising fourteen linocut prints on paper in an elongated landscape format. The subject is a biblical one, with each of the prints depicting a different moment from Jesus’ last days on Earth as a man, beginning with his condemnation by Pontius Pilate and ending with his crucifixion and laying in the tomb. The episodes portrayed – known in Christian theology as The Stations of the Cross – are precisely detailed and dramatised in Onobrakpeya’s prints, but have been placed within an African setting. The apostles wear vividly patterned local Adire prints and those restraining Jesus appear to be wearing colonial-era police uniform. The overall palette of the series is blue and green, with hints of yellow and highlights in orange. Geometric shapes abound, recalling patterns found on traditional Nigerian textiles and architecture. While these forms structure the compositions, they also extend onto the crosses that feature prominently in many of the images. The prints are individually titled as follows: Jesus is Condemned to Death, Jesus Takes his Cross, Jesus Falls the First Time, Jesus Meets his Mother, Simon of Cyrene Helps Jesus, Veronica Wipes Jesus’ Face, Jesus Falls the Second Time, Jesus and the Women of Jerusalem, Jesus Falls the Third Time, Jesus’ Clothes are Torn Off, Jesus is Nailed to the Cross, Jesus Dies on the Cross, Jesus is Taken from the Cross and Jesus is Laid in the Tomb. Thirteen of the prints are number eight in an edition of fifty. Jesus Falls the First Time is number eight in an edition of forty-eight. Complete sets of the prints are rare; although they can be shown individually, they are ideally shown all together as they were in the inaugural exhibition at Tate Modern, London in 2001, Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis.

18/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Bruce Onobrakpeya, Simon of Cyrene helps Jesus  1969

This is one in a series by Nigerian artist Bruce Onobrakpeya comprising fourteen linocut prints on paper in an elongated landscape format. The subject is a biblical one, with each of the prints depicting a different moment from Jesus’ last days on Earth as a man, beginning with his condemnation by Pontius Pilate and ending with his crucifixion and laying in the tomb. The episodes portrayed – known in Christian theology as The Stations of the Cross – are precisely detailed and dramatised in Onobrakpeya’s prints, but have been placed within an African setting. The apostles wear vividly patterned local Adire prints and those restraining Jesus appear to be wearing colonial-era police uniform. The overall palette of the series is blue and green, with hints of yellow and highlights in orange. Geometric shapes abound, recalling patterns found on traditional Nigerian textiles and architecture. While these forms structure the compositions, they also extend onto the crosses that feature prominently in many of the images. The prints are individually titled as follows: Jesus is Condemned to Death, Jesus Takes his Cross, Jesus Falls the First Time, Jesus Meets his Mother, Simon of Cyrene Helps Jesus, Veronica Wipes Jesus’ Face, Jesus Falls the Second Time, Jesus and the Women of Jerusalem, Jesus Falls the Third Time, Jesus’ Clothes are Torn Off, Jesus is Nailed to the Cross, Jesus Dies on the Cross, Jesus is Taken from the Cross and Jesus is Laid in the Tomb. Thirteen of the prints are number eight in an edition of fifty. Jesus Falls the First Time is number eight in an edition of forty-eight. Complete sets of the prints are rare; although they can be shown individually, they are ideally shown all together as they were in the inaugural exhibition at Tate Modern, London in 2001, Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis.

19/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Bruce Onobrakpeya, Veronica wipes Jesus’ face  1969

This is one in a series by Nigerian artist Bruce Onobrakpeya comprising fourteen linocut prints on paper in an elongated landscape format. The subject is a biblical one, with each of the prints depicting a different moment from Jesus’ last days on Earth as a man, beginning with his condemnation by Pontius Pilate and ending with his crucifixion and laying in the tomb. The episodes portrayed – known in Christian theology as The Stations of the Cross – are precisely detailed and dramatised in Onobrakpeya’s prints, but have been placed within an African setting. The apostles wear vividly patterned local Adire prints and those restraining Jesus appear to be wearing colonial-era police uniform. The overall palette of the series is blue and green, with hints of yellow and highlights in orange. Geometric shapes abound, recalling patterns found on traditional Nigerian textiles and architecture. While these forms structure the compositions, they also extend onto the crosses that feature prominently in many of the images. The prints are individually titled as follows: Jesus is Condemned to Death, Jesus Takes his Cross, Jesus Falls the First Time, Jesus Meets his Mother, Simon of Cyrene Helps Jesus, Veronica Wipes Jesus’ Face, Jesus Falls the Second Time, Jesus and the Women of Jerusalem, Jesus Falls the Third Time, Jesus’ Clothes are Torn Off, Jesus is Nailed to the Cross, Jesus Dies on the Cross, Jesus is Taken from the Cross and Jesus is Laid in the Tomb. Thirteen of the prints are number eight in an edition of fifty. Jesus Falls the First Time is number eight in an edition of forty-eight. Complete sets of the prints are rare; although they can be shown individually, they are ideally shown all together as they were in the inaugural exhibition at Tate Modern, London in 2001, Century City: Art and Culture in the Modern Metropolis.

20/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Vanessa Winship, Kukës, Albania  1999–2002

This black and white photograph is one of several works in Tate’s collection by the British photographer Vanessa Winship. It comes from a series entitled Imagined States and Desires: A Balkan Journey 1999–2002, which was Winship’s first major series. The series exists in an edition of twelve Fine Art pigment prints, all the same size, and Tate’s prints are various numbers from the main edition (Tate P82415–P82420). The photographs were shot in the area of southeastern Europe known as the Balkans which includes Albania and Kosovo. After the fall of Slobodan Milošević’s regime in Serbia in 2000, Winship moved to Belgrade for a year in 2001 and lived for more than a decade in the Balkans, Turkey and the Caucasus. Towards the end of the Yugoslav Wars (1991–2001), Winship began a series of trips to Albania. Under the iron fist of Enver Hoxha, Albania had been one of the most reclusive states in the Soviet orbit. After the end of communism in 1989, many Albanians then became victims of a giant government-backed Ponzi scheme, losing what little they had. In 1998, during one of Winship’s visits, war broke out between Serbia and NATO over the independence of Kosovo, a Serbian-controlled territory with a majority Albanian Muslim population. As several thousand Kosovar Albanians began to flee the violence, flooding across the border into Albania, Winship started to document the people and the landscape around her. She developed her future direction in this series, approaching the subject not as a photojournalist – a recorder of specific events – but as an artist working with a poetic sensibility and applying an oblique gaze to geopolitical realities.

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Vanessa Winship, Gjirokaster, Albania  1999–2002

This black and white photograph is one of several works in Tate’s collection by the British photographer Vanessa Winship. It comes from a series entitled Imagined States and Desires: A Balkan Journey 1999–2002, which was Winship’s first major series. The series exists in an edition of twelve Fine Art pigment prints, all the same size, and Tate’s prints are various numbers from the main edition (Tate P82415–P82420). The photographs were shot in the area of southeastern Europe known as the Balkans which includes Albania and Kosovo. After the fall of Slobodan Milošević’s regime in Serbia in 2000, Winship moved to Belgrade for a year in 2001 and lived for more than a decade in the Balkans, Turkey and the Caucasus. Towards the end of the Yugoslav Wars (1991–2001), Winship began a series of trips to Albania. Under the iron fist of Enver Hoxha, Albania had been one of the most reclusive states in the Soviet orbit. After the end of communism in 1989, many Albanians then became victims of a giant government-backed Ponzi scheme, losing what little they had. In 1998, during one of Winship’s visits, war broke out between Serbia and NATO over the independence of Kosovo, a Serbian-controlled territory with a majority Albanian Muslim population. As several thousand Kosovar Albanians began to flee the violence, flooding across the border into Albania, Winship started to document the people and the landscape around her. She developed her future direction in this series, approaching the subject not as a photojournalist – a recorder of specific events – but as an artist working with a poetic sensibility and applying an oblique gaze to geopolitical realities.

22/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Vanessa Winship, Studenica, Kosovo  1999–2002

This black and white photograph is one of several works in Tate’s collection by the British photographer Vanessa Winship. It comes from a series entitled Imagined States and Desires: A Balkan Journey 1999–2002, which was Winship’s first major series. The series exists in an edition of twelve Fine Art pigment prints, all the same size, and Tate’s prints are various numbers from the main edition (Tate P82415–P82420). The photographs were shot in the area of southeastern Europe known as the Balkans which includes Albania and Kosovo. After the fall of Slobodan Milošević’s regime in Serbia in 2000, Winship moved to Belgrade for a year in 2001 and lived for more than a decade in the Balkans, Turkey and the Caucasus. Towards the end of the Yugoslav Wars (1991–2001), Winship began a series of trips to Albania. Under the iron fist of Enver Hoxha, Albania had been one of the most reclusive states in the Soviet orbit. After the end of communism in 1989, many Albanians then became victims of a giant government-backed Ponzi scheme, losing what little they had. In 1998, during one of Winship’s visits, war broke out between Serbia and NATO over the independence of Kosovo, a Serbian-controlled territory with a majority Albanian Muslim population. As several thousand Kosovar Albanians began to flee the violence, flooding across the border into Albania, Winship started to document the people and the landscape around her. She developed her future direction in this series, approaching the subject not as a photojournalist – a recorder of specific events – but as an artist working with a poetic sensibility and applying an oblique gaze to geopolitical realities.

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Henryk Stazewski, White-Black Relief No. 6  1962

24/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Naum Gabo, Linear Construction No. 2  1970–1

'Linear Construction No.2' exists in over twenty versions, both standing and hanging. The light-catching nylon filament is wound around two intersecting plastic planes. The stringing gives a delicate sense of three dimensions in the complicated patterns created by the irregular lobe shapes of the transparent plastic. It was developed from Gabo's unrealised project for the lobby of the Esso Building in New York in the late 1940s. Two sculptures similar to 'Linear Construction No.2' were designed to be located on top of the two revolving lobby doors, turning slowly. It was one of Gabo's favourite works and was presented to the Tate in memory of the art historian Herbert Read.

Gallery label, August 2004

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Hélio Oiticica, Spatial Relief (red) REL 036  1959

Oiticica suspended this work from the ceiling so that viewers would have to walk around it. He wanted us to become active participants in the work. Only by walking around it can you see the difference in colour and shapes on both sides. It is painted in two very similar colours, chosen for their reaction to light. Oiticica was influenced by the ordered abstraction of artists such as Piet Mondrian and Kazimir Malevich, whose work is also on display in this room. But Oiticica introduced elements of movement and change, emphasising the bodily experience of his work.

Gallery label, August 2019

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

György Kepes, Gears 2 (Gears and Inked Carton)  1939–40

This is one of a large group of photograms and studies in modernist photography in Tate’s collection by the Hungarian-born photographer, painter, designer, teacher and writer, Gyorgy Kepes (see Tate P80532–P80568, T13973–T13975). They date from 1938 to the early 1940s and were made in the United States, where Kepes had emigrated in 1937. Kepes made his earliest photograms in Budapest, taking nature as his starting point, directly recording the process without a camera onto photosensitized surfaces. In the late 1920s Kepes joined the Berlin studio of the Hungarian artist and modernist photographer László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946). Moholy-Nagy had been a teacher at the Bauhaus School in Germany and was one of the principals in promoting the values of the Bauhaus movement, as well as a pioneer who experimented with a multitude of materials and techniques. Kepes was introduced to the ‘new vision’ provided by the possibilities of modern art techniques while collaborating alongside Moholy-Nagy. He began to experiment with photograms himself – photographic prints made in the darkroom by placing objects directly onto light sensitive paper and exposing the paper to light. Later, he made prints he called ‘photo-drawings’, in which he applied paint to a glass plate that he then used as though it were a negative. Only a few of Kepes’s works from this earlier period survived the artist’s many moves in the 1930s and the Second World War.

27/30
artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Mira Schendel, Untitled  1963

In this work, geometric figures in subdued colours are suspended in a dark, abstract background. The subtle use of texture and treatment of the surface adds a three-dimensional aspect to the painting. The forms are deliberately asymmetrical and hand-drawn, exemplifying the subtle subversion of European geometric abstraction in Brazilian art through the introduction of organic or destabilising elements. Schendel contributed to the development of Concrete and Neo-concrete art in Brazil during the 1960s, though she remained detached from those groups and developed a distinct and unique body of work.

Gallery label, May 2012

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Rasheed Araeen, Rang Baranga  1969

After relocating to London from Karachi, Pakistan, in 1964, Araeen was struck by the work of the British sculptor Anthony Caro and decided to devote himself full-time to sculpture. Rather than following Caro’s example of a compositionally driven practice, Araeen decided that symmetrical configuration should form the basis of a new kind of sculpture. Formally Rang Baranga resembles the structures of Sol Lewitt’s open minimalist sculptures, but unlike the American artist’s, Araeen’s forms incorporate diagonal and orthogonal elements which refer in part to Islamic art but more importantly point to his training and practice as an engineer.

Gallery label, September 2016

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Li Yuan-chia, 0 1=2  1965

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artworks in Journeys through the Tate Collection

Art in this room

AR00069: Untitled
Jannis Kounellis Untitled 1969
P79902: Stairs
Shikanosuke Yagaki Stairs 1930–9
P80043: Untitled (Material Study, Construction of Glass Plates, Josef Albers’ Preliminary Course, Bauhaus Dessau)
Edmund Collein Untitled (Material Study, Construction of Glass Plates, Josef Albers’ Preliminary Course, Bauhaus Dessau) c.1927–30
P79892: Zuyev Workers’ Club Moscow
Iwao Yamawaki Zuyev Workers’ Club Moscow 1931
P79899: Bauhaus Student
Iwao Yamawaki Bauhaus Student 1930–2

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Cameron Rowland Assessment 2018

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