View of Sammy Baloji's '802. That is where, as you head, the elephant danced the Malinga. The place where they now grow flowers'.

Exhibition views from 802. That is where, as you head, the elephant danced the Malinga. The place where they now grow flowers at Imane Farès, Paris, 2016.

Courtesy of the artist and Imane Farès.

Room 13 in Artist and Society

Sammy Baloji

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Sammy Baloji, 802. That is where, as you heard, the elephant danced the malinga. The place where they now grow flowers  2016

This is a unique installation comprising thirty-six inkjet photographs hammered by hand, wallpaper on canvas, war mortar shells dating from the First and Second World Wars (1914--18 and 1939–45), a copper ceiling plate and an audio recording. The installation’s point of departure is photographic. Baloji became interested in photographs of scarification practices while reviewing the archives of the Museum of Central Africa in Tervuren, Belgium. Scarification was a practice employed across Africa in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as a means of identifying a person’s tribe and therefore their identity and community. Baloij has rephotographed several of the photographs that he found, focusing on specific scarification patterns and cropping out surrounding details from the original archival photographs.

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Sammy Baloji 802. That is where, as you heard, the elephant danced the malinga. The place where they now grow flowers 2016