Agnes Martin, ‘Morning’ 1965
Agnes Martin, Morning 1965 . Tate . © Estate of Agnes Martin / DACS, 2020

Room 1 in In the Studio

Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

Morning

Agnes Martin, Morning  1965

Describing Morning, Martin said: ‘I had to leave out a lot of things that one expects to see in a painting... I was painting about happiness and bliss and they are very simple states of mind I guess. Morning is a wonderful dawn, soft and fresh.’ She began making delicate hand-drawn grids in 1960. Here the grid is made from dark graphite and subtle red pencil lines, on a painted background. By doing this, Martin blurred the boundaries between painting and drawing.

Gallery label, February 2020

© Estate of Agnes Martin / DACS, 2020

License this image

1/5
artworks in Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

The Queen

Lenore Tawney, The Queen  1962

Tawney created her large, free-hanging works using ‘open-warp’ weaving techniques. This leaves some of the warp threads uncovered, creating vertical slits. The finished work is not densely woven like a traditional textile. It is transparent and hangs away from the wall. The Queen is from a group of weavings that Tawney first exhibited at the Staten Island Museum, New York, in 1962. The weavings were named by the artist Agnes Martin, who wrote a statement for the exhibition’s leaflet.

Gallery label, February 2020

© Tate

License this image

2/5
artworks in Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

Sorry, no image available

Lenore Tawney, That Enters From the End Into the Beginning  1964

Tawney saw the slow and precise process of creating both her drawings and her textiles as a form of meditation. These detailed drawings are made in ink with a fine pen. They are mostly drawn on graph or squared paper. Tawney visited a factory in New Jersey to observe a Jacquard weaving loom. Inspired by this visit, she studied for a year at the Textile Institute in Philadelphia and learned how to use a loom. It was during this time that she produced this series of detailed drawings.

Gallery label, August 2020

3/5
artworks in Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

Sorry, no image available

Lenore Tawney, Light in Darkness  1965

Tawney saw the slow and precise process of creating both her drawings and her textiles as a form of meditation. These detailed drawings are made in ink with a fine pen. They are mostly drawn on graph or squared paper. Tawney visited a factory in New Jersey to observe a Jacquard weaving loom. Inspired by this visit, she studied for a year at the Textile Institute in Philadelphia and learned how to use a loom. It was during this time that she produced this series of detailed drawings.

Gallery label, August 2020

4/5
artworks in Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

Sorry, no image available

Lenore Tawney, From Its Center  1964

Tawney saw the slow and precise process of creating both her drawings and her textiles as a form of meditation. These detailed drawings are made in ink with a fine pen. They are mostly drawn on graph or squared paper. Tawney visited a factory in New Jersey to observe a Jacquard weaving loom. Inspired by this visit, she studied for a year at the Textile Institute in Philadelphia and learned how to use a loom. It was during this time that she produced this series of detailed drawings.

Gallery label, August 2020

5/5
artworks in Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

Art in this room

Morning
Agnes Martin Morning 1965
The Queen
Lenore Tawney The Queen 1962

Sorry, no image available

Lenore Tawney That Enters From the End Into the Beginning 1964

Sorry, no image available

Lenore Tawney Light in Darkness 1965

Sorry, no image available

Lenore Tawney From Its Center 1964

We recommend