Joseph Mallord William Turner

Notes by James Hakewill on Travelling in Italy

1819

In Tate Britain

Prints and Drawings Room

View by appointment
Artist
Joseph Mallord William Turner 1775–1851
Medium
Pen and ink on paper
Dimensions
Support: 88 × 114 mm
Collection
Tate
Acquisition
Accepted by the nation as part of the Turner Bequest 1856
Reference
D13889
Turner Bequest CLXXI 17

Catalogue entry

This page contains an inscription by James Hakewill (1778–1843), with whom Turner collaborated on the engraved print project, Picturesque Tour of Italy, published 1820. It represents advice to Turner on travelling in Italy in preparation for the artist’s first tour of the country in 1819 (see the introduction to the sketchbook). The text was first transcribed by Finberg,1 and is repeated here with minor variations:
At Naples go to the Crocelli | pronounced Crochelly – | go the ^to^ Puzzuoli and the Coast of | Baiae – | to Ischia, Procida & Capua. | to Pompeii, Salerno, & Paestum. | In Naples. See Canova’s group | at the Marquis Berrio’s.
Hakewill’s suggestions are based upon his own travels to Italy in 1816–17 and views of Procida, Pompeii, Salerno and Paestum can be found amidst his drawings from the time (British School at Rome Library).2 For Turner’s sketches meanwhile see the Gandolfo to Naples sketchbook (Tate; Turner Bequest CLXXXIV), Pompeii, Amalfi, Sorrento and Herculaneum (Tate; Turner Bequest CLXXXV) and the Naples, Paestum, Rome sketchbook (Tate; Turner Bequest CLXXXVI). The Albergo di Crocelli meanwhile, was a hotel in Naples popular with English-speaking tourists. Turner would have been familiar with it through a number of sources. It was mentioned in Henry Coxe’s Picture of Italy, first published 1815,3 as well as by Henry Sass in his guidebook, A Journey to Rome and Naples, Performed in 1817; Giving an Account of the Present State of Society in Italy; and Containing Observations on the Fine Arts, London 1818, a copy of which Turner owned.4 Furthermore, it also appears amongst the inscribed recommendations of an unknown author in the Vatican Fragments sketchbook (see Tate D40621; Turner Bequest CLXXX inside back cover).
Whilst in Naples, Hakewill also advises Turner to view a sculptural ‘group’ by Antonio Canova (1757–1822), one of the most celebrated Italian artists of the day. This was the famous Parting of Venus and Adonis, which between 1795 and 1821 could be seen in the palace of Marchese Francesco Berio di Salsa on the Via Toledo.

Nicola Moorby
March 2010

1
Finberg 1909, p.497.
2
Tony Cubberley and Luke Herrmann, Twilight of the Grand Tour: A Catalogue of the drawings by James Hakewill in the British School at Rome Library, Rome 1992, nos.5.45–5.58, pp.273–.90
3
Henry Coxe, A Picture of Italy, second edition, London 1818, pp.313, 317–8.
4
Henry Sass, A Journey to Rome and Naples, Performed in 1817; Giving an Account of the Present State of Society in Italy; and Containing Observations on the Fine Arts, London 1818, p.345

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