Ernest Cole, [no title] 1965–6 . Tate . © Ernest Cole / Magnum Photos

Room 4 in Artist and Society

Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

1/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

2/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

3/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

4/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

5/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

6/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

7/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

8/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

9/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

10/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

11/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

12/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

13/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

14/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

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artworks in Ernest Cole

Sorry, no image available

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

16/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

17/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

18/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Ernest Cole, [no title]  1965–6

This is one of a group of twenty-one black and white photographs in Tate’s collection from the South African photographer Ernest Cole’s series House of Bondage 1965–6 (Tate P82526–46). The photographs, which were taken on 35mm film, are gelatin silver prints on paper and are all untitled. The works can be described as documentary in practice, each capturing an element of day-to-day life under the Apartheid regime in South Africa. There is a particular focus on the black community: from the long commutes from townships to cities, shown in the overcrowding of trains; to the harsh conditions in gold mines and related accommodation for miners; to understaffed and underfunded hospitals; the daily realities of pass raids; and the destruction of townships to make space for building expansion. In some works, Cole has photographed signs that depict the rules that separated different strands of society under Apartheid, with permits needed to enter specific locations, or only allowing entry into buildings via specific routes. Other images are more playful, depicting children cooling off with a water sprinkler or friendships between black and white South Africans. For the most part, the subjects in the images seem to be unaware that they are being photographed.

19/19
artworks in Ernest Cole

Art in this room

P82526: [no title]
Ernest Cole [no title] 1965–6
P82527: [no title]
Ernest Cole [no title] 1965–6
P82530: [no title]
Ernest Cole [no title] 1965–6
P82531: [no title]
Ernest Cole [no title] 1965–6
P82533: [no title]
Ernest Cole [no title] 1965–6
P82535: [no title]
Ernest Cole [no title] 1965–6

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