Santu Mofokeng, ‘Dust Storms at Noon on the R34 Between Welkom and Hennenman, Free State I’ 2007, printed 2011
Santu Mofokeng, Dust Storms at Noon on the R34 Between Welkom and Hennenman, Free State I 2007, printed 2011 . Tate . © Santu Mofokeng, courtesy Maker, Johannesburg

Room 11 in Artist and Society

Photography & Environment

The Gold Mine, Brazil

Sebastião Salgado, The Gold Mine, Brazil  1986

Killip’s series Sea Coal, Lynemouth, Northumberland was shot between 1982 and 1984 in a coastal village in North East England. Lynemouth was known for its community of so-called ‘sea-coalers’. Sea-coalers made their living by collecting and selling coal washed up on the beach. The coal came from local mines. It had been spilled or dumped into the sea for decades, alongside other industrial waste. In the early 1980s, many mines and factories closed across England as part of a wider process of deindustrialisation. Hundreds of thousands of heavy industry workers were left without a job. Many sea-coalers were ex-miners.

Gallery label, April 2021

© Sebastião Salgado

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1/5
artworks in Photography & Environment

Mining, Brazil

Sebastião Salgado, Mining, Brazil  1986

The Serra Pelada series focuses on miners and their working environment. The mountain site has been dramatically transformed by heavy mining activities. Here Salgado shows the miners as an integral part of this landscape.

Salgado has documented working conditions across the world throughout his career. Since the 1990s he has also actively contributed to the reforestation and conservation of the Atlantic Forest in Brazil.

Gallery label, June 2021

© Sebastião Salgado

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2/5
artworks in Photography & Environment

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Edward Burtynsky, Oil Spill #2, Discoverer Enterprise, Gulf of Mexico, May 11, 2010  2010, printed 2011

This large colour landscape format photograph by the Canadian artist Edward Burtynsky depicts an aerial view of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a disaster which began on 20 April 2010, three weeks before this image was taken. Near the centre of the work is the vessel noted in the title, Discoverer Enterprise, an enormous drillship measuring over 250 metres in length used for deep water exploration. A smaller ship can also be glimpsed at the top of the image. These vessels sit within a wide expanse of sea where the dark blue water is coated with large streaks of silvery oil, the brightness of which are heightened by the glint of sharp sunlight. The work consists of a digital chromogenic print adhered to a rigid laminated board.

3/5
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Jem Southam, March 2000  2000, printed 2003

This is one of four works in Tate’s collection from Jem Southam’s series Upton Pyne (see Tate L03982–L03985). These large-format colour photographs were taken with a large-format view camera which produces 8 x 10 inch (205 x 255 mm) negatives that record a high level of detail. The photographs have been printed to a dimension of 914 x 1080 millimetres in editions of eight; Tate’s copy of March 2000 is number three in the edition. The images depict four different views of a pond on the edge of the small rural village of Upton Pyne, near Exeter in Devon, in the South West England. The titles of the four photographs indicate the date at which they were taken: March 2000, December 2000, January 2001 and February 2001. They are part of a larger series depicting a pond set within in a sparsely built-up landscape. In the four photographs the sky is of a similar, uniform grey. A few houses and sheds dot the surroundings, while the shores of the pond have been transformed into a sort of suburban garden, with planted vegetation, plastic garden furniture, flowerbeds, wooden benches and other plastic ornaments. Where January 2001 offers a view of the pond surrounded by trees, with little evidence of human intervention, December 2000 provides a more desolate depiction of a neglected site, surrounded by vehicles and cheaply constructed buildings.

4/5
artworks in Photography & Environment

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Jem Southam, December 2000  2000, printed 2003

This is one of four works in Tate’s collection from Jem Southam’s series Upton Pyne (see Tate L03982–L03985). These large-format colour photographs were taken with a large-format view camera which produces 8 x 10 inch (205 x 255 mm) negatives that record a high level of detail. The photographs have been printed to a dimension of 914 x 1080 millimetres in editions of eight; Tate’s copy of December 2000 is number one in the edition. The images depict four different views of a pond on the edge of the small rural village of Upton Pyne, near Exeter in Devon, in the South West England. The titles of the four photographs indicate the date at which they were taken: March 2000, December 2000, January 2001 and February 2001. They are part of a larger series depicting a pond set within in a sparsely built-up landscape. In the four photographs the sky is of a similar, uniform grey. A few houses and sheds dot the surroundings, while the shores of the pond have been transformed into a sort of suburban garden, with planted vegetation, plastic garden furniture, flowerbeds, wooden benches and other plastic ornaments. Where January 2001 offers a view of the pond surrounded by trees, with little evidence of human intervention, December 2000 provides a more desolate depiction of a neglected site, surrounded by vehicles and cheaply constructed buildings.

5/5
artworks in Photography & Environment

Art in this room

The Gold Mine, Brazil
Sebastião Salgado The Gold Mine, Brazil 1986
Mining, Brazil
Sebastião Salgado Mining, Brazil 1986

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Edward Burtynsky Oil Spill #2, Discoverer Enterprise, Gulf of Mexico, May 11, 2010 2010, printed 2011

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Jem Southam March 2000 2000, printed 2003

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Jem Southam December 2000 2000, printed 2003