Tate Modern Exhibition

Modigliani

Modigliani painting

Amedeo Modigliani Nude 1917 (detail) Private Collection

See some of the most memorable art of the 20th century at Tate Modern’s comprehensive retrospective of Modigliani’s work

During his brief and turbulent life Modigliani developed a unique and instantly recognisable pictorial style. Though meeting little success during their time, his emotionally intense portraits and seductive nudes are now among the best-loved paintings of the 20th century.

Modigliani’s nudes are a highlight of the exhibition – with 12 nudes on display, this is the largest group ever reunited in the UK. These sensuous works proved controversial when they were first shown in 1917, leading police to censor his only ever solo exhibition on the grounds of indecency.

You will also discover his lesser-known but radical and thought-provoking sculptures, as well as his portraits of his friends, lovers and supporters, including Pablo Picasso, Constantin Brancusi and his partner Jeanne Hébuterne.

Thanks to a pioneering partnership with HTC Vive, the exhibition also transports visitors to the heart of early 20th century Paris using the latest virtual reality technology.

Modigliani VR Experience: The Ochre Atelier

The experience is a recreation of Modigliani’s final studio, which uses the actual studio space as a template.

A limited number of visitors will be able to view the VR experience on a first-come, first-served basis by joining the queue outside room 10 of the exhibition. Average wait is 25 minutes.

Tate Modern

Bankside
London SE1 9TG
Plan your visit

Dates

23 November 2017 – 2 April 2018

Extended opening hours:
Friday 30 and Saturday 31 March open until midnight
Sunday 1 and Monday 2 April open until 22.00
Last entry and ticket sale 45 minutes before closure

Members early morning viewings every weekend from 08.00 (and Monday 2 April)

In partnership with

Produced by

Supported by

Maryam and Edward Eisler

With additional support from

The Modigliani Exhibition Supporters Circle

Susan and John Burns
Italian Cultural Institute
and those who wish to remain anonymous

Tate Patrons

and Tate Members

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