Philip Guston

1913–1980

Philip Guston, ‘Monument’ 1976
Monument 1976
© The Estate of Philip Guston
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In Tate Britain

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Biography

Philip Guston (pronounced like "rust"), born Phillip Goldstein (June 27, 1913 – June 7, 1980), was a painter and printmaker in the New York School, an art movement that included many abstract expressionists like Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. In the late 1960s Guston helped to lead a transition from abstract expressionism to neo-expressionism in painting, abandoning so-called "pure abstraction" in favor of more representational, cartoonish renderings of various personal situations, symbols and objects.

He is known for his cartoonish paintings of an existential, lugubrious nature that employed a limited palette and were created in the period after 1968. Moreover, he was a lecturer and teacher at a number of universities and so he is also regarded for his words and teachings, collected in the book Philip Guston: Collected Writings, Lectures, and Conversations (Documents of Twentieth-Century Art).

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Artworks

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Art Term

Neo-expressionism

Neo-expressionism acted as a major revival of painting in an expressionist manner in the 1980s and it occurred internationally

Tate Etc
Tate Etc

I've never painted an abstract picture in my life

Kenneth Baker and Ben Luke

Howard Hodgkin in conversation

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