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Performer and Participant

Discover how artists working between the 1960s and the 1990s opened up new spaces for participation

Ana Lupas, ‘The Solemn Process’ 1964–2008 (1964–74/76; 1980–5; 1985–2008)
Ana Lupas, The Solemn Process 1964–2008 (1964–74/76; 1980–5; 1985–2008) . Tate . © Ana Lupas

8 rooms in Performer and Participant

Great Tactile Table

Paul Neagu, Great Tactile Table  1970

Like many of Neagu’s ‘palpable objects’, this work contains many small boxes or compartments. These boxes are filled with small metallic objects which the spectator was invited to feel. Great Tactile Table is the largest of a group of sculptures with compartments arranged to form human figures. Neagu called these figures ‘anthropocosmos’, a term combining the Greek words for man and universe. The compartmentalised structure refers to the cellular composition of the human body. It is also a metaphor for larger systems, such as society, which consist of individual yet interrelated parts.

Gallery label, September 2016

© Estate of Paul Neagu

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The Solemn Process

Ana Lupas, The Solemn Process  1964–2008 (1964–74/76; 1980–5; 1985–2008)

The Solemn Process 1964–2008 is a large-scale installation comprising twenty-one unique metal sculptures of varying dimensions and forms, as well as two large wall vinyls, each displaying a grid of forty sepia-toned images. It was created over a period of five decades by Romanian artist Ana Lupas. The photographs feature a series of straw objects in rural, agricultural settlements. Some of the images are also populated by people who interact or pose with them. The objects in the photographs are the same shape as the metal sculptures, suggesting that there is a direct relationship between them despite the different materials and their presence in the gallery. Indeed, the two vinyl panels and the sculptural objects can be seen as discrete elements that directly relate to the three phases in which the work was made: the first between 1964 and 1974 and into 1976, the second between 1980 and 1985 and the third between 1985 and 2008. These three phases relate to the changing social and political situation in Romania.

© Ana Lupas

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Untitled

Edward Krasinski, Untitled  2001

Untitled 2001 is a room installation consisting of twelve mirrors of equal size suspended from the ceiling, and Krasinski’s signature blue Scotch tape. A continuous strip of tape is stuck horizontally onto the walls of the room at a height of 130cm from the floor. The verso of each mirror, which is black, has also had a strip of blue scotch tape stuck to it, and the mirrors are hung so that the tape on their backs is also at a height of 130cm from the floor. The mirrors, all facing in the same direction, reflect the surrounding architecture, the black backs of the other mirrors with their blue strips, and the continuous blue strip on the wall. This creates the illusion of a space that both recedes and advances depending on the viewpoint of the visitor. Of course, viewers entering the visual field created by the mirrors are also reflected, and so may disrupt the real and reflected continuity of the blue line. T12558 was first installed in 2001 at the Klosterfelde Gallery, Berlin, alongside several untitled sculptural objects, including T12559, T12560, T12567 and T12624, which were exhibited on plinths of varying heights. Krasinski often included works he had produced in the 1960s and 1970s in his later installations, or incorporated photographs of them into his subsequent works (see T12559). The inclusion of older works within a newer installation creates a tension between the past and the present, whilst Krasinski’s use of mirrors, in conjunction with his signature blue tape, is part of his ongoing exploration of notions of infinity and space.

© The estate of Edward Krasinski, courtesy Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw

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Intervention 15

Edward Krasinski, Intervention 15  1975

T12568 is an axonometric painting, with black acrylic lines depicting a white three-dimensional geometric object on a black background. The term ‘axonometric’ refers to a drawing method used to represent a three-dimensional object on a two-dimensional support – vertical lines are drawn to scale, but the diagonals are distorted in order to give the illusion of depth and volume. The painting also features Krasinski’s signature blue Scotch tape, which has been positioned so that it appears to pass from the wall to the left of the painting onto the canvas, following the contours of the three-dimensional object depicted, and continuing onto the wall to the right of the painting. The strip, which is usually positioned at exactly 130cm from the ground, is therefore subjected to the inner logic of the image.

© The estate of Edward Krasinski, courtesy Foksal Gallery Foundation, Warsaw

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Tactile Object (Hand)

Paul Neagu, Tactile Object (Hand)  1970

These two sculptures are variations of Neagu’s ‘tactile’ and ‘palpable’ objects. Both combine textured surfaces with more elaborate imagery and religious symbols. On the top of Tactile Object is a cross made from strips of leather. Palpable Object contains cut-outs in the shape of human figures, giving the box the feeling of a coffin or reliquary.

Religious references appear in several of Neagu’s works. In the video of Cake Man Event, also shown in this gallery, the ritualised eating of waffles recalls the Christian Holy Communion.

Gallery label, September 2004

© Estate of Paul Neagu

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Highlights

Great Tactile Table
Paul Neagu Great Tactile Table 1970
The Solemn Process
Ana Lupas The Solemn Process 1964–2008 (1964–74/76; 1980–5; 1985–2008)
Untitled
Edward Krasinski Untitled 2001
Intervention 15
Edward Krasinski Intervention 15 1975
Tactile Object (Hand)
Paul Neagu Tactile Object (Hand) 1970

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