Now booking Tate Modern Exhibition

Zanele Muholi

Black and white self-portrait of the artist with combs in their hair

Zanele Muholi
Qiniso, The Sails, Durban 2019
© Zanele Muholi
Courtesy of the Artist and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York

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Tate Modern presents the first major UK survey of visual activist Zanele Muholi

Zanele Muholi is one of the most acclaimed photographers working today, and their work has been exhibited all over the world. With over 260 photographs, this exhibition presents the full breadth of their career to date.

Muholi describes themself as a visual activist. From the early 2000s, they have documented and celebrated the lives of South Africa’s Black lesbian, gay, trans, queer and intersex communities.

In the early series Only Half the Picture, Muholi captures moments of love and intimacy as well as intense images alluding to traumatic events – despite the equality promised by South Africa’s 1996 constitution, its LGBTQIA+ community remains a target for violence and prejudice.

In Faces and Phases each participant looks directly at the camera, challenging the viewer to hold their gaze. These images and the accompanying testimonies form a growing archive of a community of people who are risking their lives by living authentically in the face of oppression and discrimination.

Other key series of works, include Brave Beauties, which celebrates empowered non-binary people and trans women, many of whom have won Miss Gay Beauty pageants, and Being, a series of tender images of couples which challenge stereotypes and taboos.

Muholi turns the camera on themself in the ongoing series Somnyama Ngonyama – translated as ‘Hail the Dark Lioness’. These powerful and reflective images explore themes including labour, racism, Eurocentrism and sexual politics.​

Exhibition organised by Tate Modern in collaboration with the Maison Européenne de la Photographie, Paris, Gropius Bau, Berlin and Bildmuseet at Umeå University.

Research supported by Hyundai Tate Research Centre: Transnational.

Please read our safety guidelines below before you visit.

Black and white self-portrait of the artist

Buhlalu I, The Decks, Cape Town 2019
Courtesy of the Artist and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York

Black and white self-portrait of the artist

Courtesy of the Artist and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York

Black and white self-portrait of the artist
Black and white self-portrait of the artist

Vile, Gothenburg, Sweden 2015
Courtesy of the Artist and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York

Black and white self-portrait of the artist

Xiniwe at Cassilhaus, North Carolina 2016
Courtesy of the Artist and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York

Black and white self-portrait of the artist

Qiniso, The Sails, Durban 2019
Courtesy of the Artist and Stevenson, Cape Town/Johannesburg and Yancey Richardson, New York

Our exhibition guide explores the exhibition room by room or read our glossary.

Tate Modern's entrance is via the Turbine Hall on Holland Street. There are automatic sliding doors and a ramp down to the entrance.

The Exhibition is on Level 2 of the Blavatnik Building. There are lifts to every floor of the Blavatnik and Nathalie Bell buildings. Alternatively you can take the stairs.

  • Fully accessible toilets are located on every floor on the concourses.
  • A quiet room is available to use in the Natalie Bell Building on Level 4.
  • Ear defenders can be borrowed from the Ticket desks.

For more information before your visit:

Check all Tate Modern accessibility information

Visitor numbers are being carefully managed to ensure that your visit is as safe and comfortable as possible. There are increased cleaning regimes in high use areas and protective screens on desks and counters. We are only accepting card or contactless payments and have installed hand sanitiser dispensers throughout the gallery.

When you visit:

  • Keep your distance from others
  • Follow the one-way route
  • Act on any guidance our team may give you
  • Limit your party to six people or two households only

All visitors are required to wear face coverings in our galleries, apart from those who are exempt. Not all exemptions are visible so please be understanding of others.

Most importantly if you are feeling unwell, help keep everyone safe by staying at home.

For more information take a look through our frequently asked questions.

Tate Modern

Bankside
London SE1 9TG
Plan your visit

Dates

5 November 2020 – 31 May 2021

Extended opening until 20.00 on 22 and 29 May 2021

  • Timed tickets must be booked before visiting
  • All visitors including Members need to book a ticket
  • This ticket includes access to the collection route

Pricing

£13 / Free with ticket for Members

Concessions available

£5 for Tate Collective. 16–25? Sign up and log in to book

See Booking and Ticketing FAQs

Content guidance: This exhibition contains themes related to gender and sexuality-based discrimination, hate crimes and racism. It also contains sexual images.

Supported by

The Zanele Muholi Exhibition Supporters Circle

Veronica and Lars Bane Foundation
The Mead Family Foundation

Tate Americas Foundation, Tate Patrons and Tate Members

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