Free Display

In the Studio

Investigate the processes artists use to make artworks, and how our responses are integral to the piece

© Lee Mawdsley

13 rooms in In the Studio

Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

Agnes Martin and Lenore Tawney

The room invites you to consider how painting, weaving and drawing can be meditative processes

Go to room

Agnes Martin
Morning 1965
© Estate of Agnes Martin / DACS, 2020

Explore In the Studio

Explore In the Studio

Glimpse inside the working spaces of artists

Go to room

​Photograph © Tate 2016 (Seraphina Neville)

International Surrealism

International Surrealism

See surrealist artworks made by the original Paris-based group and other international artists 

Go to room

Maria Helena Vieira da Silva
The Tiled Room 1935
© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2020

The Disappearing Figure: Art after Catastrophe

The Disappearing Figure: Art after Catastrophe

Survey the impact of the catastrophic events of WWII on the art that followed

Go to room

Germaine Richier
Chessboard, Large Version (Original Painted Plaster) 1959
© The estate of Germaine Richier

Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler

This room brings together works by a leading abstract painter of the post-war period

Go to room

Helen Frankenthaler Vessel 1961, oil paint on canvas, 2540 x 2390 mm, Presented by the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation (Tate Americas Foundation) 2019
© 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Jordan Tinker, courtesy Helen Frankenthaler Foundation

 

 

Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko

Absorb Rothko's paintings, displayed as he intended in a compact room with subtle lighting

Go to room

Mark Rothko
Black on Maroon 1959
© Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko/DACS 2020

A View from Zagreb: Op and Kinetic Art

A View from Zagreb: Op and Kinetic Art

Explore the geometric abstract art created by the New Tendencies movement in the 1960s

Go to room

Carlos Cruz-Diez
Physichromie No. 113 1963, reconstructed 1976
© ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2020

Addendum

Eva Hesse, Addendum  1967

The hemispheres along the bar of Eva Hesse’s Addendum are positioned at increasing intervals determined by a fixed mathematical series. Many artists used serial systems at this time because they provided a way of composing sculptures without recourse to personal expression. Hesse hung rope cords from each hemisphere which fall to the ground in unpredictable curls. The regulated structure of the bar contrasts with the disordered appearance of the cords. But Hesse recognised that such systems were hardly rational, commenting that ‘Serial art is another way of repeating absurdity’.

Gallery label, October 2016

© The estate of Eva Hesse, courtesy Hauser & Wirth, Zürich

License this image

1/12
highlights in In the Studio

Seated Woman with Small Dog

Meraud Guevara, Seated Woman with Small Dog  c.1939

This is one of a number of precise and realistic paintings of women by Meraud Guevara that share a disquieting atmosphere. The sitter wholly dominates the steep angled space, which could not contain her if she stood. A sense of mystery is suggested by the imaginary view (placing the room high above the landscape), the open doorway behind, and the inexplicable, but deliberate, flash of orange beside the door.

Gallery label, October 2016

© Estate of Meraud Guevara

License this image

2/12
highlights in In the Studio

Meditation (with open eyes)

Atul Dodiya, Meditation (with open eyes)  2011

Meditations (With Open Eyes) 2011 is an installation that comprises three wooden cabinets with glass fronts, with artworks and objects placed both inside and on top. In them the Indian artist Atul Dodiya has assembled an assortment of objects, much in the manner of traditional cabinets of curiosities found in historic collections and museums. The dense, slightly informal arrangement of the objects gives the work the appearance of a series of personal shrines, similar to the humble glass cabinets common in middle-class Indian homes which preserve souvenirs and items based on emotional rather than material value: photos, travel memorabilia, toys and gifts, religious icons and the like. The title of the work suggests conscious memory and the contemplation of objects that trigger recollections. The cabinets are arranged in a row, mounted on the wall, and the central one is slightly taller than the two flanking it on either side. Dodiya had previously worked with museological-style displays in works, referencing and paying tribute to the Indian nonviolent activist and nationalist icon Mohandas (Mahatma) Gandhi (1869–1948) and fellow artist Bhupen Khakhar (1934–2003). An early example was Broken Branches 2003, in which Dodiya was inspired by the dusty cases containing personal effects and memorabilia in the regional museum about Gandhi in the small town of Porbandar. The particular iteration of cabinets in Meditations (With Open Eyes) is more autobiographical and relates closely to Dodiya’s own art practice.

© Atul Dodiya

License this image

3/12
highlights in In the Studio

Spiral Movement

Mary Martin, Spiral Movement  1951

‘Abstract painting gave me a desire to use three-dimensional materials and this first essay was based on the same concept I had used in painting’, Martin wrote. ‘I took a simple element (in this case a parallelepiped – a solid figure whose faces are six parallelograms) and subjected it to a system of changes, not knowing what would happen to it…. I think all my work has been based on this kind of curiosity.’ The composition was determined by a complex layering of geometrical relationships, in this case based on the Golden Section.

Gallery label, October 2016

© Estate of Mary Martin / DACS 2020

License this image

4/12
highlights in In the Studio

The Three Dancers

Pablo Picasso, The Three Dancers  1925

With its emphasis on violence and sex, The Three Dancers was greatly admired by the surrealists. It started off as a realistic representation of ballet dancers rehearsing. While Picasso was working on it his old friend Ramon Pichot died. Twenty years earlier, Pichot and another friend, Carlos Casagemas, fell in love with the same woman, Germaine Gargallo. Casagemas took his own life, having first shot at Gargallo. Recalling these events transformed Picasso’s approach. The distorted angular figures, harsh colours and thickly worked paint surfaces seem to express violent emotions.

Gallery label, April 2019

© Succession Picasso/DACS 2020

License this image

5/12
highlights in In the Studio

Chessboard, Large Version (Original Painted Plaster)

Germaine Richier, Chessboard, Large Version (Original Painted Plaster)  1959

These five figures represent the principal pieces in a game of chess: the King, Queen, Knight, Castle and Bishop. Rather than the elegant designs of traditional chessmen, these are grotesque hybrid figures. The knight has a horse’s head, while the Bishop (known in France as the Fool) resembles a hunchbacked jester. Richier used distorted animal and partly human figures to reflect the anxieties and despair of post-war Europe. ‘It seems to me that in violent works there is just as much sensibility as in poetic ones’, she said. ‘There can be just as much wisdom in violence as in gentleness’.

Gallery label, October 2016

© The estate of Germaine Richier

License this image

6/12
highlights in In the Studio

I Love the Whole World

Agnes Martin, I Love the Whole World  1999

I Love the Whole World is an abstract painting by the Canadian-American artist Agnes Martin. This five-foot square canvas is painted with horizontal peach stripes on a white background. The stripes are divided into two sets of eight with a white band running horizontally between them and directly through the centre of the canvas. Above and below the sets of peach stripes there are white channels the same width as the central band that extend to the edge, while on the left and right sides the stripes extend the length of the canvas. Graphite pencil lines demarcate the edges of each stripe, although they taper off toward the edges of the canvas. Horizontal brushstrokes are faintly visible within each stripe.

© estate of Agnes Martin

License this image

7/12
highlights in In the Studio

Lobster Telephone

Salvador Dalí, Lobster Telephone  1936

In the early 1930s, Dalí promoted the idea of the Surrealist object, of which this is a classic example. The Surrealists valued the mysterious and provocative effect of such unexpected conjunctions. Dalí, in particular, believed that his objects could reveal the secret desires of the unconscious. Lobsters and telephones had strong sexual connotations for him, and he drew a close analogy between food and sex. He made Lobster Telephone for Edward James, the British collector who was the most active patron of Surrealist artists in the 1930s.

Gallery label, July 2008

© Salvador Dali, Gala-Salvador Dali Foundation/DACS, London 2020

License this image

8/12
highlights in In the Studio

Perspex Group on Orange (B)

Mary Martin, Perspex Group on Orange (B)  1969

This is one of a series of five works that Martin entitled Perspex Group on Orange. For each one she arranged seven pieces of Perspex in a different configuration, assembling them against a large orange square of the same material. The sizes of the different pieces are based on the Fibonacci series – a mathematical sequence in which each successive number is generated by adding together the two previous numbers. ‘One commences with a single cell, or unit, a logical process of growth is applied and the whole, or the effect, is unforeseen until the work is complete’, Martin explained.

Gallery label, January 2019

© Estate of Mary Martin / DACS 2020

License this image

9/12
highlights in In the Studio

Water-Lilies

Claude Monet, Water-Lilies  after 1916

In the 1890s, Monet developed a Japanese-style water-garden around the pond at his home in Giverny, north-west of Paris. The garden became an ‘outside studio’ for the artist, and the water-lilies floating on the surface of the pond became the principal motif of his later paintings. Filling the canvas, the pond becomes a world in itself, inspiring a sense of immersion in nature. At times verging on abstraction, the water-lily pictures are the culmination of Monet’s fascination with light and its changing effects on the natural environment.

Gallery label, November 2012

Courtesy National Gallery, London 2003. Photo:Tate

License this image

10/12
highlights in In the Studio

Ishi’s Light

Anish Kapoor, Ishi’s Light  2003

This sculpture is named after Kapoor’s son Ishan, but also refers to Anna’s Light (1968), an abstract work by the American painter Barnett Newman. Kapoor combines saturated colours and contrasting materials to create sculptures that absorb or reflect light or sound to modify the viewer’s sense of space and create an almost immersive experience. Here the deep blood red colour and enveloping form of Ishi’s Light combine to suggest warmth and security.

Gallery label, October 2016

© Anish Kapoor

License this image

11/12
highlights in In the Studio

Red on Maroon

Mark Rothko, Red on Maroon  1959

Red on Maroon is a large unframed oil painting on a vertically orientated rectangular canvas. The base colour of the painting is a muted maroon. As is suggested by the work’s title, this is overlaid with a large red rectangle, which in turn encloses a narrower maroon rectangle, suggesting a window-like structure. The red paint forms a solid block of colour but the edges seep slightly, blurring into the areas of maroon. Different pigments have been used within the maroon, blending shades of crimson and mauve colour. This changing tone gives a sense of depth in an otherwise abstract composition.

© Kate Rothko Prizel and Christopher Rothko/DACS 2020

License this image

12/12
highlights in In the Studio

Highlights

Addendum
Eva Hesse Addendum 1967
Seated Woman with Small Dog
Meraud Guevara Seated Woman with Small Dog c.1939
Meditation (with open eyes)
Atul Dodiya Meditation (with open eyes) 2011
Spiral Movement
Mary Martin Spiral Movement 1951

You've viewed 4/12 highlights

You've viewed 12/12 highlights

Related events