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Media Networks

See how artists in Tate’s collection have responded to the impact of mass media

© Lee Mawdsley

13 rooms in Media Networks

James Rosenquist and Allora & Calzadilla

James Rosenquist and Allora & Calzadilla

International artists have responded in different ways to the impact of mass media and communications

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James Rosenquist, Skull Snap, 1989. © James Rosenquist/VAGA, New York and DACS, London 2018

Modern Times

Modern Times

Feel the excitement and anxiety generated by the modern city

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Umberto Boccioni
Unique Forms of Continuity in Space 1913, cast 1972

Franciszka and Stefan Themerson

Franciszka and Stefan Themerson

Explore the lifelong artistic collaboration of Franciszka and Stefan Themerson

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Franciszka Themerson
Two Pious Persons Making their Way to Heaven, one propellered, one helicoptered, with a little angel below 1951
© Themerson Estate

Feminism and media

Feminism and media

This room looks at how gender stereotypes from the mass media have been confronted and subverted by feminist artists in the past 50 years

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Guerrilla Girls
Guerrilla Girls’ Definition Of Hypocrite 1990
© courtesy www.guerrillagirls.com

Yin Xiuzhen

Yin Xiuzhen

Using everyday materials, Yin Xiuzhen makes sculptural objects to explore themes of power and individual identity

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Yin Xiuzhen Weapon 2003–7 

©️ 2019 Yin Xiuzhen Photographer: Song Dong. 

A view from Buenos Aires

A view from Buenos Aires

Discover artworks that explore organisational systems, communications and mass media

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Cildo Meireles
Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project 1970
© Cildo Meireles

Painting and Mass Media

Painting and Mass Media

Witness contemporary painters who use images from the mass media as a source of inspiration

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Wilhelm Sasnal
Gaddafi 3 2011
© Wilhelm Sasnal, courtesy Sadie Coles HQ

Martin Creed

Martin Creed

Contemplate this conceptual artwork

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Martin Creed
Work No. 232: the whole world + the work = the whole world 2000
© Martin Creed

Whaam!

Roy Lichtenstein, Whaam!  1963

Whaam! is based on an image published in 1962 in the DC comic, All American Men of War. Lichtenstein often drew on commercial art sources such as comics and advertisements. He was interested how they depict highly emotional subject matter relating to love or war in a cool, impersonal way.

Gallery label, August 2018

© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

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Babel

Cildo Meireles, Babel  2001

Babel 2001 is a large-scale sculptural installation that takes the form of a circular tower made from hundreds of second-hand analogue radios that the artist has stacked in layers. The radios are tuned to a multitude of different stations and are adjusted to the minimum volume at which they are audible. Nevertheless, they compete with each other and create a cacophony of low, continuous sound, resulting in inaccessible information, voices or music.

© Cildo Meireles

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Bust of a Woman

Pablo Picasso, Bust of a Woman  1944

This portrait of the photographer Dora Maar was painted on 5 May 1944. Her reconfigured features may reflect the complex atmosphere of the final weeks of the Nazi Occupation of Paris. Deprivation and tension remained high in the city. In February two of Picasso’s closest Jewish friends – the poets Robert Desnos and Max Jacob – had been deported. Yet there were also signs of defiance and hope: in March, Maar took part alongside Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir in a clandestine performance of Picasso’s play Desire Caught by the Tail, directed by Albert Camus.

Gallery label, February 2016

© Succession Picasso/DACS 2020

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Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project

Cildo Meireles, Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project  1970

Meireles altered a series of Coca-Cola bottles, by printing slogans such as ‘Yankees go home’ or instructions for making Molotov cocktails on them. He put them back into circulation in what he described as an act of subversive ‘mobile graffiti’, enacted under Brazil’s military dictatorship. He saw the system of recycling empty bottles as a way of enabling a political message to circulate surreptitiously. He has compared the Coca-Cola bottles to ‘messages in bottles, flung into the sea by victims of shipwrecks’.

Gallery label, February 2016

© Cildo Meireles

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Highlights

Whaam!
Roy Lichtenstein Whaam! 1963
Babel
Cildo Meireles Babel 2001
Bust of a Woman
Pablo Picasso Bust of a Woman 1944
Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project
Cildo Meireles Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project 1970